> 3 weeks along the Miskito Coast and Corn Islands in Nicaragua <

We’we travelled through Central America and experienced all of the countries and most regions of this little slice of earth. One of the most interesting is Nicaragua in general, and the east-cost specifically. Nicaragua's eastern edge forms the long Miskito Coast that borders the Caribbean Sea all the way from Honduras down to the Corn Islands. It is the less traveled part of Nicaragua and one of the remotest parts of Central America. Even today, the nature and people remain relatively unchanged because of its remoteness. Its muddy roads, thick rain forest, many rivers, and lack of infrastructure make Mosquito Coast-travel very difficult. Basically, it’s one big swamp. This part of Nicaragua is mostly inhabited by Miskito Indians, descendants of the Caribs, who were driven away from the Pacific coast by the ancient Nahuas of Pipiles Indians, eventually reaching the Misikito coast where they settled down.

The Corn Islands, or Isla del Maíz, are located in an isolated corner of the Caribbean, 70-85 km off the coast of Bluefields at the southern end of the Miskito Coast. Both islands retain all the charm associated with the Caribbean: Turquoise waters, deserted white-sand beaches, rocky coves fringed with coconut palms, magical sunsets, coral reefs, friendly people, Garífuna cuisine, and an unhurried, peaceful pace of life. Some Miskito Indians still reside on the Corn Islands to this day, although most of the population is either black Garifuna or a mixture of black and Miskito Indian. The former, Garifuna’s, are a mixture of African, Carib and Arawak and they have a distinctive culture, making a living from fishing, primarily lobster and shrimp. 

We spent a couple of weeks on the Corn Islands - diving, hiking around both islands, and enjoying the scenery. Also, we traveled a few hundred kilometers along the Miskito Coast from Bluefields and north. During this stretch, we stayed in Laguna Perlas and in primitive local shelters on a number of keys off the Miskito Coast. It was quite expensive to arrange and very primitive but all worth it.

For more island hopping adventures in Central America, check our pages on the Mesomerican Reef and the Bocas del Toro islands in Panama. Additionally, in Central America we criss-crossed all countries, and climbing the wild Volcanos of Guatemala.

 

Selected pics:

 

MISKITO COAST & CORN ISLANDS

Schyy, our little secret gem on the Caribbean coast in Central America

Map of Miskito Coast
Map of Miskito Coast

Nicaragua's eastern edge forms the long Miskito Coast that borders the Caribbean Sea all the way from Honduras down to the Corn Islands. It is the less traveled part of Nicaragua and one of the remotest parts of Central America.

Arrival in Laguna de Perlas
Arrival in Laguna de Perlas

After a very hard-hitting overland travel from Managua to Bluefields via the Rio Escondito, and then a long boat tour of some 80km north of Bluefields through the mangrove systems we arrive at tiny Laguna Perlas in the murky lagoon on the Miskito Coast. Here, 18 small indigenous communities make a living off fish, shrimp and lobster.

Streets of Laguna de Perlas
Streets of Laguna de Perlas

We spent a few days just walking around the tiny settlement and enjoying the local atmosphere. It was easy to walk to nearby beaches and visit fishing villages. The lagoon has a good collection of ramshackle houses and bars.

Locals on Paisaje de Awas
Locals on Paisaje de Awas

Probably the best swimming beach in the area 45 minutes walking north of Laguna de Perlas. H

Panga excoursion off to Pearl Keys
Panga excoursion off to Pearl Keys

We spent a few days arranging a 5-day panga boat trip into the Peal Keys as well as Kuanwatla village and Prinzapolka village further north on the Miskito Coast. We had to charter a private panga (120 USD per day) and a guide.Here, our guide is navigating one of the many swamps on the way north.

Indians in Prinzapolka village
Indians in Prinzapolka village

One of the tiny villages where Miskito and Mayangna Indians are raised on slender wooden stilts. They live in a world of no roads as the entire Miskito Coast is a broad alluvial flood plain, washed down from the central highlands by four major river systems. In this case, the Rio Prinzapolca.

Arrival in Baboon Cay
Arrival in Baboon Cay

Along the coast are several tropical and remote keys with white sand, clear water and packed reefs. Many of them are communally owned by the Miskito Indians. It is "our" private pange in the picture.

Our "hotel" in Baboon Cay
Our "hotel" in Baboon Cay

The conditions was very primitive as we had to sleep on the beach and live off freshly cought fish for the entire tour. Well, there are so few places left on this planet offering such a good experience so we felt privileged.

Preparing dinner
Preparing dinner

Baboon Cay on the Miskito Coast

Arrival in Lime Cay
Arrival in Lime Cay

Yet another cay where we spent two days. There was absolutely nothing to do but to snorkel, go fishing or help with the cooking three times a day. What a treat!

View over Lime Cay
View over Lime Cay
Cooking dinner in Lime Cay
Cooking dinner in Lime Cay
Arrival in Sandy Bay Cay
Arrival in Sandy Bay Cay

The last day and on the final key we stayed on it was raining a lot. But we felt lucky as it had not been raining a lot. More than 90% of Nicaragua's rainfall ends up on the Miskito Coast.

Drying fish for next days breakfast
Drying fish for next days breakfast

Sandy Bay Cay in the Miskito Coast

Back in Bluefields
Back in Bluefields

After nearly two weeks further north on the Miskito Coast we returned to Bluefileds. Here we spend a few days enjoying the local cuisine: lobster, lobster and more lobster from hole-in-the-window restaurants.

Back in Bluefields
Back in Bluefields

As it was a bit frustrating to find out when the ferryboat for the Corn Islands was leaving, we took a short flight instead. The Corn Islands are 70 km offshore.

Arrival in Litlle Corn Island
Arrival in Litlle Corn Island

The journey across from Big Corn Island took 45 by small boat. We arrived in Pelican Beach where a number of primitive hotels and restaurants are placed. Big Corn Island (Isla del Maíz) is the largest with nearly 6000 inhabitants, whereas its diminutive sister Little Corn Island (Isla Pequeña del Maíz) merely has 500 residents.

Market in Little Corn Island
Market in Little Corn Island

In the entire region hawksbill turtles nest on the beaches, peaking in August when we was there. They are traditionally hunted by the locals for their tasty meat although they are endangered.

Walking around Little Corn Island
Walking around Little Corn Island

Little Corn Island is very low-key with an unhurried, peaceful pace. ere are no vehicles in the island but only a sandy path leading to the northern and eastern parts of the island. I went around town to talk to the locals and watch how they produce lobster traps. Lobsters are in season from June to February, so people where pretty busy when I was there in August.

Our place - Casa Sunrise
Our place - Casa Sunrise

As we had to find a place for the night, we picked the path leading north from the village and started walking. After approximately 45 minutes we reached a little paradise-like stretch of beach with 3 bungalows: Casa Sunrise. Apparently, we wore the only visitors and the owner was very happy to have accomodate us. For 10 US$ a night we a bed, fan and the water-edge very nearby.

View from our bungalow
View from our bungalow

The Corn Islands retain all the charm associated with the Caribbean: Turquoise waters, deserted white-sand beaches scattered in between rocky coves and fringed with coconut palms, Garífuna cuisine, magical sunsets, and offshore coral reefs. Little Corn Island

Local fisher producing lobster traps
Local fisher producing lobster traps

Little Corn Island

Local Girl, Little Corn Island
Local Girl, Little Corn Island
Walk around the island
Walk around the island

Little Corn Island is far smaller than the big island, but it still takes 4-5 hours to walk around the islet as it’s surrounded by rocky coves in between the many deserted white-sand beaches. We followed the beaches/coves around the entire island instead of the path in the jungle. We had to do simple rock climbing along the way in the southern part of Little Corn Island.

Back on Big Corn Island
Back on Big Corn Island

Big Corn Island is only 6 sq km and you can easily walk around it in 4-5 hours – the walk is roughly 15 km. One day we spent the morning walking around the island following the shore, and in the afternoon we did the trip on a rented motorbike, sticking to the paved road. Our route on foot: North End, Anastasia Point, Sally Peaches, Silver Point, South End, Long Bay, Southwest Bay, Waula Point, Brig Bay and Mosquito Swamp Point.

Dinner in the late afternoon
Dinner in the late afternoon

In town are many small local comedores (eateries) and food-stalls offering cheap food, usually fish or chicken. Yummy!

Anastasia Point, Big Corn Island
Anastasia Point, Big Corn Island

Around the island are pretty wooden houses, a few churches and good beaches, although the really magical beaches are located in Little Corn Island. I brought my snorkel gear with me (mask, fins and snorkel). The corals at North End and Sally Peaches are really in good shape and the waters offer abundant fish. One places, I saw four lazy nurse-sharks and moments after some reef-sharks.

Girl in Brig Bay, Big Corn Island
Girl in Brig Bay, Big Corn Island
Brig Bay shelters
Brig Bay shelters

One or two local families usually share a one/two-room cabin, made of left-over sheer metal.

Preparing a diving trip
Preparing a diving trip

Both islands had excellent diving with many sites fairly close to shore. We have to return some day during January as there are manuy hammer-head sharks in this period.